Monday, May 14, 2012

New Titles

                                                                                              
1) Burt, Marissa. Storybound. 2012. Harper. Hardbound: 406 pages. Price: $16.99 U.S.

SUMMARY: When Una Fairchild stumbles upon a mysterious book buried deep in the basement of her school library, she thinks nothing of opening the cover and diving in. But instead of paging through a regular novel, Una suddenly finds herself Written In to the land of Story—a world filled with Heroes and Villains and fairy-tale characters.
     But not everything in Story is as magical as it seems. Una must figure out why she has been Written In—and fast—before anyone else discovers her secret. Together with her new friend Peter and a talking cat named Sam, Una digs deep into Story's shadowy past. She quickly realizes that she is tied to the world in ways she never could have imagined—and it might be up to her to save it.
RECOMMENDATION: For ages 8-12. Think of this book as a hybrid between Harry Potter and InkHeart.


                                                                                               
2) Paul, Ellen (editor). Emerging Avian Disease (Studies in Avian Biology, 42). 2012. University of California Press. Hardbound: 108 pages. Price: $39.95 U.S.
SUMMARY: In this volume, new human disease pandemics, arising from animals stimulated by ongoing environmental change, demonstrate the value of ornithological research into avian diseases. A group of 29 researchers addresses a diverse set of topics, including the evolutionary and ecological aspects of the host-vector systems, the effects of genetic variation, introduction success and vector ecology, evolution of resistance and virulence of pathogens, and the effects of changing geographic distributions. In addition to empirical studies under field conditions, the authors present predictive models to assess the movement and potential impact of these diseases. Other chapters delve into the potential impacts of pathogens and the key role of biosurveillance and documenting impacts of disease on bird populations.
RECOMMENDATION: For those with a technical interest in avian disease.





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