Saturday, July 2, 2011

New Audio CD

                                                                              
1) Lysinger, Mitch, John V. Moore, and Niels Krabbe. The Birds of Cabanas San Isidro (Ecuador). 2010. John V. Moore Nature Recordings. MP-3 CD and booklet. Price: $14.95 U.S.

SUMMARY: This publication consists of a single data CD containing all vocalizations in MP3 format as well as detailed recording data in both WORD and EXCEL files, and is a revised and updated edition of the 2 cassette publication “The Birds of Cabañas San Isidro” originally published in 1997 and updated with minor modifications in 2000.
     They present 594 separate recordings of 207 species including 53 species and 272 vocalizations not included in the cassette publication. Presented are the sounds of most of the bird species that inhabit the Cabañas San Isidro property, as well as the surrounding area comprising the Rio Cosanga Valley up to and including the Cordillera de Guacamayos Ridge to the southeast. Cabañas San Isidro is a charming tourist lodge nestled in the picturesque Quijos valley near the small town of Cosanga, 100 kilometers east of Ecuador’s capital city, Quito. The lodge itself is located at an altitude of approximately 6800 feet (2073m). However, the trails leading from the lodge cover elevations from approximately 6000 to almost 7600 feet (1829-2316m). Habitats range from primary montane forest, secondary woodland, riverine edge, and Chusquea (Bamboo) stands, to cleared pasture. The avifauna at San Isidro contains elements of both the Subtropical zone (throughout most of the area) and the lower Temperate zone (on the upper slopes).
     Although this publication contains vocalizations from many of the species already presented in the 6 digital publications featuring Ecuador birds by John V. Moore Nature Recordings, 22 of the species, 29 of the subspecies and several of the vocal types presented in this data CD have not been featured in our previous publications.
RECOMMENDATION: The species names are announced. Birders visiting the region should find these recordings useful.

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