Tuesday, April 29, 2014

New Title


1) Kennedy, Adam Scott. Birds of Kenya's Rift Valley. 2014 Princeton/ WILDGuides. Paperback: 256 pages. Price: $29.95 U.S.
PUBLISHER'S SUMMARY: Kenya's Rift Valley includes four major national parks--Lake Nakuru, Lake Bogoria, Mount Longonot, and Hell's Gate--as well as many smaller areas that are outstanding for wildlife. Birds of Kenya’s Rift Valley features the 320 bird species that are most likely to be encountered on safari in this world-famous region, which runs from Lake Baringo in the north to Lake Magadi in the south. Featuring over 500 stunning color photos, this beautiful guide breaks new ground with its eye-catching layout and easy-to-use format. The book follows a habitat-based approach and provides interesting information about the ecology and behaviors of each species. Birds of Kenya's Rift Valley avoids technical jargon in the species descriptions, which makes the guide easily accessible to anyone. With it, you will be identifying birds in no time.
    This book features:
  • Stunning photos of 320 bird species
  • Major plumage variations depicted
  • Jargon-free text
  • Helpful notes on what to look and listen for, behavior, and why some birds are so named.

RECOMMENDATION: A good introductory photo guide to the birds of the region.

The Weekly Birdbooker Report

                                           Photo copyright: Joe Fuhrman


My WEEKLY Birdbooker Report can be found here: http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/birdbooker-report-318/

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

New Titles

 
1) Page, Jeremy. The Collector of Lost Things: A Novel. 2013. Pegasus Books. Hardbound: 373 pages. Price: $ 25.95 U.S.
PUBLISHER'S SUMMARY: The year is 1845 and young researcher Eliot Saxby is paid to go on an expedition to the Arctic in the hope of finding remains of the by-now-extinct Great Auk, a large flightless bird of mythical status.      Eliot joins a hunting ship, but the crew and the passengers are not what they seem. Caught in the web of relationships on board, Eliot struggles to understand the motivations of the sociopathic Captain Sykes; the silent First Mate, French; the flamboyant laudanum-addicted Bletchley; and most importantly of all, Bletchley's beautiful but strange 'cousin' Clara.
      As the ship moves further and further into the wilds of the Arctic Sea, Eliot clings to what he believes in, desperate to save Clara but irrevocably drawn back into a past that haunts him—and a present that confronts him with a myriad of dangers.
RECOMMENDATION: Birders might enjoy the Great Auk subplot.





2) Youth, Howard. Field Guide to the Natural World of Washington, D.C.. 2014. Johns Hopkins University Press. Paperback: 393 pages. Price: $24.95 U.S.
PUBLISHER'S SUMMARY: Nature awaits discovery at almost every turn in the complex ecosystem of Washington, D.C. In parks large and small, within the District's gardens, and on public streets, there is tremendous biodiversity. In Field Guide to the Natural World of Washington, D.C., naturalist Howard Youth takes us on an urban safari, describing the wild side of the nation's capital.
      Beyond the abundant wildlife that can be seen in every neighborhood, Washington boasts a large park network rich in natural wonders. A hike along the trails of Rock Creek Park, one of the country’s largest and oldest urban forests, quickly reveals white-tailed deer, eastern gray squirrels, and little brown bats. Mayapples, Virginia bluebells, and red mulberry trees are but a few of the treasures found growing at the National Arboretum. A stroll along the Potomac and Anacostia Rivers might reveal stealthy denizens such as bullfrogs, largemouth bass, and common snapping turtles. Detailed drawings by Carnegie artist Mark A. Klingler and photography by Robert E. Mumford, Jr., reveal the rich color and stunning beauty of the flora and fauna awaiting every D.C. naturalist.
      Whether seeking a secluded jog or an adventurous outing, residents and tourists alike will find this handsome guide indispensable for finding oases away from the noise of the city.
RECOMMENDATION: A good general introduction to the natural history of the region.

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

New Title


1) Helfman, Gene and George H. Burgess. Sharks: The Animal Answer Guide. 2014. Johns Hopkins University Press. Paperback: 249 pages. Price: $26.95 U.S.
PUBLISHER'S SUMMARY: Answering every conceivable question about sharks, authors Gene Helfman and George H. Burgess describe the fascinating biology, behavior, diversity (there are more than 1,000 species worldwide), and cultural importance of sharks, their close relationship to skates and rays, and their critical role in healthy ecosystems.
       Helfman and Burgess take readers on a round-the-world tour of shark habitats, which include oceans as well as lakes and even rivers (as far up the Mississippi as St. Louis). They describe huge, ferocious predators like (Great) White and Tiger sharks and species such as Basking and Whale sharks that feed on microscopic prey yet can grow to lengths of more than 40 feet. The mysterious and powerful Greenland shark, the authors explain, reaches a weight of 2,200 pounds on a diet of seal flesh. Small (less than 2-foot long) Cookiecutter sharks attack other sharks and even take a chunk out of the occasional swimmer.
      Despite our natural fascination with sharks, we have become their worst enemy. Many shark species are in serious decline and a number are threatened with extinction as a result of overfishing and persecution. Sharks: The Animal Answer Guide presents a perfect mix of current science, history, anthropology, intriguing facts, and gripping photographs. Whether your fascination with sharks stems from fear or curiosity, your knowledge of these animals will improve immensely when you consult this book.
RECOMMENDATION: A good general overview on the subject.

Monday, April 21, 2014

The Weekly Birdbooker Report

                                             Photo copyright: Joe Fuhrman

My WEEKLY Birdbooker Report can be found here: http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/birdbooker-report-317/

Thursday, April 17, 2014

New Titles




1) Hauber, Mark E. with John Bates and Barbara Becker (editors). The Book of Eggs: A Life-Size Guide to the Eggs of Six Hundred of the World's Bird Species. 2014. The University of Chicago Press. Hardbound: 656 pages. Price: $55.00 U.S.
PUBLISHER'S SUMMARY: From the brilliantly green and glossy eggs of the Elegant Crested Tinamou—said to be among the most beautiful in the world—to the small brown eggs of the house sparrow that makes its nest in a lamppost and the uniformly brown or white chickens’ eggs found by the dozen in any corner grocery, birds’ eggs have inspired countless biologists, ecologists, and ornithologists, as well as artists, from John James Audubon to the contemporary photographer Rosamond Purcell. For scientists, these vibrant vessels are the source of an array of interesting topics, from the factors responsible for egg coloration to the curious practice of “brood parasitism,” in which the eggs of cuckoos mimic those of other bird species in order to be cunningly concealed among the clutches of unsuspecting foster parents.
     The Book of Eggs introduces readers to eggs from six hundred species—some endangered or extinct—from around the world and housed mostly at Chicago’s Field Museum of Natural History. Organized by habitat and taxonomy, the entries include newly commissioned photographs that reproduce each egg in full color and at actual size, as well as distribution maps and drawings and descriptions of the birds and their nests where the eggs are kept warm. Birds’ eggs are some of the most colorful and variable natural products in the wild, and each entry is also accompanied by a brief description that includes evolutionary explanations for the wide variety of colors and patterns, from camouflage designed to protect against predation, to thermoregulatory adaptations, to adjustments for the circumstances of a particular habitat or season. Throughout the book are fascinating facts to pique the curiosity of binocular-toting birdwatchers and budding amateurs alike. Female mallards, for instance, invest more energy to produce larger eggs when faced with the genetic windfall of an attractive mate. Some seabirds, like the cliff-dwelling guillemot, have adapted to produce long, pointed eggs, whose uneven weight distribution prevents them from rolling off rocky ledges into the sea.
     A visually stunning and scientifically engaging guide to six hundred of the most intriguing eggs, from the pea-sized progeny of the smallest of hummingbirds to the eggs of the largest living bird, the ostrich, which can weigh up to five pounds, The Book of Eggs offers readers a rare, up-close look at these remarkable forms of animal life.
RECOMMENDATION: An eggcellent overview to birds' eggs (mostly North American species).



 

2) Grant, Peter R. and B. Rosemary Grant. 40 Years of Evolution: Darwin's Finches on Daphne Major Island. 2014. Princeton University Press. Hardbound: 400 pages. Price: $49.50 U.S.
PUBLISHER'S SUMMARY: Renowned evolutionary biologists Peter and Rosemary Grant have produced landmark studies of the Galápagos finches first made famous by Charles Darwin. In How and Why Species Multiply, they offered a complete evolutionary history of Darwin's finches since their origin almost three million years ago. Now, in their richly illustrated new book, 40 Years of Evolution, the authors turn their attention to events taking place on a contemporary scale. By continuously tracking finch populations over a period of four decades, they uncover the causes and consequences of significant events leading to evolutionary changes in species.
     The authors used a vast and unparalleled range of ecological, behavioral, and genetic data--including song recordings, DNA analyses, and feeding and breeding behavior--to measure changes in finch populations on the small island of Daphne Major in the Galápagos archipelago. They find that natural selection happens repeatedly, that finches hybridize and exchange genes rarely, and that they compete for scarce food in times of drought, with the remarkable result that the finch populations today differ significantly in average beak size and shape from those of forty years ago. The authors' most spectacular discovery is the initiation and establishment of a new lineage that now behaves as a new species, differing from others in size, song, and other characteristics. The authors emphasize the immeasurable value of continuous long-term studies of natural populations and of critical opportunities for detecting and understanding rare but significant events.
     By following the fates of finches for several generations, 40 Years of Evolution offers unparalleled insights into ecological and evolutionary changes in natural environments.
RECOMMENDATION: For those with a technical interest in Darwin's Finches.

New Title


1) Goulson, Dave. A Sting in the Tale: My Adventures with Bumblebees. 2014. Picador. Hardbound: 256 pages. Price: $25.00 U.S.
PUBLISHER'S SUMMARY: Dave Goulson became obsessed with wildlife as a small boy growing up in rural Shropshire, starting with an increasingly exotic menagerie of pets. When his interest turned to the anatomical, there were even some ill-fated experiments with taxidermy. But bees are where Goulson’s true passion lies—the humble bumblebee in particular.
      Once commonly found in the marshes of Kent, the English short-haired bumblebee went extinct in the United Kingdom, but by a twist of fate still exists in the wilds of New Zealand, the descendants of a few pairs shipped over in the nineteenth century. Dave Goulson’s passionate quest to reintroduce it to its native land is one of the highlights of a book that includes original research into the habits of these mysterious creatures, history’s relationship with the bumblebee, and advice on how to protect the bumblebee for future generations.
      One of the United Kingdom’s most respected conservationists and the founder of the Bumblebee Conservation Trust, Goulson combines lighthearted tales of a child’s growing passion for nature with a deep insight into the crucial importance of the bumblebee. He details the minutiae of life in the nest, sharing fascinating research into the effects intensive farming has had on our bee population and the potential dangers if we are to continue down this path.

RECOMMENDATION: Fans of bumblebees should enjoy this book.

Monday, April 14, 2014

The Weekly Birdbooker Report

                                           Photo copyright: Joe Fuhrman

My WEEKLY Birdbooker Report can be found here: http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/birdbooker-report-316/

Friday, April 11, 2014

New Title


1) Bertozzi, Nick. Shackleton: Antarctic Odyssey. 2014. First Second. Paperback: 128 pages. Price: $16.99 U.S.
PUBLISHER'S SUMMARY: Ernest Shackleton was one of the last great Antarctic explorers, and he led one of the most ambitious Antarctic expeditions ever undertaken. This is his story, and the story of the dozens of men who threw in their lot with him - many of whom nearly died in the unimaginably harsh conditions of the journey. It's an astonishing feat - and was unprecedented at the time - that all the men in the expedition survived.
     Shackleton's expedition marked the end of a period of romantic exploration of the Arctic and the Antarctic, and this is as much a book about the encroaching modern world as it is about travel. But Nick Bertozzi has documented this remarkable journey with such wit and fiendish attention to detail that it's impossible not to get caught up in the drama of the voyage. Shackleton is a phenomenal accompaniment to Bertozzi's earlier graphic novel about great explorers, Lewis & Clark.
RECOMMENDATION: For ages 12 and Up. An entertaining way to introduce older children to this chapter of polar exploration.

 


Wednesday, April 9, 2014

New Title


1) Rivera-Sylva, Héctor E., Kenneth Carpenter, and Eberhard Frey (editors). Dinosaurs and Other Reptiles from the Mesozoic of Mexico. 2014. Indiana University Press. Hardbound: 216 pages. Price: $50.00 U.S.
PUBLISHER'S SUMMARY: This overview of dinosaur discoveries in Mexico synthesizes current information about the geography and environment of the region during the Mesozoic when it was the western margin of the ancient continent of Pangea. The book summarizes research on various groups, including turtles, lepidosauromorphs, plesiosaurs, crocodyliforms, pterosaurs, and last but not least, dinosaurs. In addition, chapters focus on trackways and other trace fossils and on K/P boundary (the Chicxulub crater, beneath the Gulf of Mexico, has been hypothesized as the site of the boloid impact that killed off the dinosaurs). Dinosaurs and Other Reptiles from the Mesozoic of Mexico is an up-to-date, informative volume on an area that has not been comprehensively described until now.
RECOMMENDATION: A MUST have for anyone with an interest in the paleontology of Mexico.
 

Monday, April 7, 2014

New Title


1) Pratchett, Terry and Stephen Briggs. Turtle Recall: The Discworld Companion. . .So Far. 2014. Harper. Hardbound: 464 pages. Price: $27.99 U.S.
PUBLISHER'S SUMMARY: The Discworld, as everyone knows, is a flat world balanced on the backs of four elephants which, in turn, stand on the shell of the giant star turtle, the Great A'Tuin, as it slowly swims through space.
      It is also a global publishing phenomenon with sales of nearly 85 million books worldwide (and counting). With 39 books in the canon, not including the various guides, maps, diaries, and other tie-in volumes, there's a lot of Discworld to keep track of—more than most fans can manage without magic.
      Turtle Recall is the ultimate authority on probably the most heavily populated—certainly the most hilarious—setting in fantasy literature and includes a guide to Discworld locales from Ankh-Morpork to Zemphis, as well as information to help you distinguish Achmed the Mad from Jack Zweiblumen and the Agatean Empire from the Zoons. Plus much, much more.
     Covering everything from The Colour of Magic, the first Discworld novel, through Snuff!, Turtle Recall: The Discworld Companion . . .So Far is the most up-to-the-minute encyclopedia of Terry Pratchett's extraordinary universe available.
RECOMMENDATION: This title was first published in Britain in 2012, so it doesn't include Raising Steam, but otherwise Discworld fans will want this book.

The Weekly Birdbooker Report

                                                Photo copyright: Joe Fuhrman

My WEEKLY Birdbooker Report can be found here: http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/birdbooker-report-315/

Thursday, April 3, 2014

New Title

 
1) Heinrich, Bernd. The Homing Instinct: Meaning and Mystery in Animal Migration. 2014. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Hardbound: 352 pages. Price: $27.00 U.S.
PUBLISHER'S SUMMARY: Acclaimed scientist and author Bernd Heinrich has returned every year since boyhood to a beloved patch of western Maine woods. What is the biology in humans of this deep-in-the-bones pull toward a particular place, and how is it related to animal homing?
Heinrich explores the fascinating science chipping away at the mysteries of animal migration: how geese imprint true visual landscape memory; how scent trails are used by many creatures, from fish to insects to amphibians, to pinpoint their home if they are displaced from it; and how the tiniest of songbirds are equipped for solar and magnetic orienteering over vast distances. Most movingly, Heinrich chronicles the spring return of a pair of sandhill cranes to their home pond in the Alaska tundra. With his trademark “marvelous, mind-altering” prose (Los Angeles Times), he portrays the unmistakable signs of deep psychological emotion in the newly arrived birds—and reminds us that to discount our own emotions toward home is to ignore biology itself.
RECOMMENDATION: Fans of Heinrich's other works should enjoy this one!
 

Wednesday, April 2, 2014

New Title

 
1) Smallshire, Dave and Andy Swash. Britain's Dragonflies: A Field Guide to the Damselflies and Dragonflies of Britain and Ireland (Third Edition). 2014. Princeton University Press/WILDGuides. Paperback: 224. Price: $25.95 U.S.
PUBLISHER'S SUMMARY: Britain's Dragonflies is the only comprehensive photographic field guide to the damselflies and dragonflies of Britain and Ireland. Written by two of Britain's foremost experts, this fully revised and updated edition features hundreds of stunning images and identification charts covering all 56 resident, migrant and former breeding species, and seven potential vagrants. The book focuses on identification--both of adults and larvae--highlighting the key features. Detailed species profiles provide concise information on identification, distribution, flight periods, behaviour, habitat, status and conservation. Other sections cover biology; how to watch, photograph, record and monitor Dragonflies; conservation status and legislation; and introduced exotic species.
      This redesigned, updated and expanded edition features:
  • Beautiful colour plates showing males, females, immatures and all colour forms for every species
  • Over 450 stunning photographs and 550 illustrations
  • Up-to-date species profiles and distribution maps
  • Detailed, easy-to-use identification charts for adults and larvae

RECOMMENDATION: A MUST have for anyone with an interest in the Odonata of the United Kingdom.